Jackie Kennedy- Andy Warhol's Modern Madonna - DailyArtDaily.com
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Published on March 13th, 2017 | by Magda Michalska

Jackie Kennedy- Andy Warhol’s Modern Madonna

The Oscars inspired me to watch the latest film about Jackie Kennedy directed by Pablo Larrain and starring Natalie Portman:

jackie

Natalie Portman as Jackie in her famous pink Chanel suit. Source: IMDb

While I was watching, my thoughts ran to one of the most famous, partly for its controversial nature, series by Andy Warhol featuring the photographs of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, the First Lady, who was the wife of the 35th president of the United States from 1961 to 1963.

Andy Warhol, Sixteen Jackies, 1964. Private Collection, New York., © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Andy Warhol, Sixteen Jackies, 1964. Private Collection, New York., © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

The series dates to the weeks following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas on November 22, 1963, and the beginnings of Warhol’s experiments with screen-printing technique. Warhol, dazzled by the staggering amount of press coverage on the event, admitted: “What bothered me was the way television and radio were programming everybody to feel so sad. It seemed like no matter how hard you tried, you couldn’t get away from the thing.”

Andy Warhol, Nine Jackies. 1964, The Sonnabend Collection, on long-term loan to Ca' Pesaro, International Gallery of Modern Art, Venice, Italy, Nina Sundell and Antonio Homem,© 2014 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Andy Warhol, Nine Jackies. 1964, The Sonnabend Collection, on long-term loan to Ca’ Pesaro, International Gallery of Modern Art, Venice, Italy, Nina Sundell and Antonio Homem,© 2014 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

The serial nature of the portraits, which amount to c. 300 different pieces, is Warhol’s comment on the mechanisms of media which, bludgeoning its audience with a set of pictures and words, program them to think and feel a certain way. The comment on the media and the contemporary society by using the familiar and popular in a new way, was one of the characteristics of Warhol’s work.

Andy Warhol, "Jackie," 1964. © 2014 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Andy Warhol, “Jackie,” 1964. © 2014 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Warhol, hypnotized by the face of First Lady, would collect the photographs of her from the press and print them on small canvases with blue- and gold-colored grounds. The colours are fundamental here as they refer to the centuries-old tradition of religious painting, with blue and gold being the most precious pigments and therefore used to highlight the importance, or sanctity, of a depicted figure. As Warhol’s close associate Bob Colacello, concluded “Andy was making religious art for a secular culture”, and with his portraits of Marilyn and the film star Elizabeth Taylor, the “trilogy of saints – two Magdalens and a Holy Virgin – was complete.” By the Holy Virgin Colacello meant Jackie, a modern Madonna, who witnessed the death of her loved ones, suffered, but remained strong and revered by many.


About the Author

Magda, an art historian-to-be, she writes about art because she cannot make it herself. She loves committed and political artists like Ai Wei Wei or the Futurists; like Joseph Beuys she believes that art can change us and we can change the world.



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